Meet Your Artist: Sara Willadsen

Who are you? What do you do?

My name is Sara Willadsen and I am a visual artist and freelance designer from Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin. I received my M.F.A. in Painting from Northern Illinois University in 2014 and my B.A. in Fine Arts and Graphic Arts from Lakeland College in 2010.

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Meet the Artist: Chris Dorn

Who are you? What do you do?

I am Chris Dorn. I work in a variety of mediums, drawing, oils, printmaking, and various forms of photography. My work is series-based. I enjoy creating work that fits within a larger body of work. Part of the reason is that I like exploring concepts over an extended period of time, and the other reason is that I like to finish a work in a day. When I’m not creating art, I’m either working at the Trout Museum of Art or Anderson Pens.

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Meet Your Artist: Ali Fuller

Who are you? What do you do?

My name is Ali Fuller and I am a 20-year-old student originally from Lindstrom, Minnesota, beginning her third year at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. I am an Environmental Studies major with a Government minor, and a self-taught artist on the side. My medium of choice is graphite (a simple mechanical pencil is my tool of choice), although I paint with ink, watercolor, and acrylics as well.

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Meet Your Artist: Cori Lin

Who are you? What do you do?

I am an artist living in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Currently, I am in my second year with Americorps, focusing on youth work and programming. Trained in printmaking, painting, and anthropology, I create art to visually organize and process my thoughts (my journal is not so different from my sketchbook).  My work is personal, self-deprecating, and hangry.

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Meet Your Artist: Mariana Russell

Who are you? What do you do?

Mariana Russell ArtI’m Mariana Russell. I am mainly an abstract painter but I also printmake and work with collage/mixed media. Working with multiple mediums can be daunting at times because there are so many options to choose from. It is as if the conversation possibilities are so extended that it is difficult to narrow down what one might want each element to say to each other element. On the other hand, having so much language can also be liberating, especially in the starting point of the process.

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